Improve SEO rankings with press releases

Posted by on Sep 29, 2016 in Blog, Featured | 0 comments

Press releases over the past years have played an important role in improving search engine rankings. The game rules for press releases and copy in general have changed since the introduction of the Google Hummingbird update in 2013 (see my blog on how Hummingbird affects copy). New press release game rules Instead of focusing on keywords, provide content your readers seek. Try to figure out what the reader is searching for by putting yourself in your reader’s shoes. Then offer the information or content they’re looking for. Since smartphones are used more often when searching for answers, content has to address user or customer ‘intent’ and needs. According to Fred Godlash, Marketing Specialist, Business Wire, ‘Content in the release should be intuitive enough to answer the user intent in the query. Make sure to include quotes, which are useful for conveying everyday speech and for answering anticipated questions. Also make sure your targeted keywords are incorporated into a natural language flow.’ For instance, use ‘conversational, mobile-friendly speech’. He offers a good tip: link your company’s FAQ page in the boilerplate of your press release. Use branded anchor text Mickie Kennedy, Founder of eReleases, says using branded anchor text (the name of the company in a link such as Stars & Tulips)  or URL links (for example: See www.stars-tulips.com for more information) is far more effective than matching anchor text (this is text the user clicks on when following a link) in the link  to the target page’s exact keyword. Optimizing anchor text is no longer a good strategy and one Google might even penalize. Think like a journalist Content is king. Unique and valuable content is more important than ever, according to Mickey. ‘Your press releases need to be newsworthy.’ Think also in terms of answering ‘Who, What, When, Where, Why and How’ when anticipating questions. Add these answers to your FAQ list as well. You are now on the road to writing a better digital press release.   Image courtesy of Ryan McGuire, Bells Design (http://www.gratisography.com/). An incredible source for free images....

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Why oil & gas needs content marketing

Posted by on Sep 29, 2016 in Blog, Featured, Portfolio | 0 comments

Oil & gas companies can make a big leap forward by embracing a good content marketing strategy. ‘Many in the industry refuse to “meet people where they are at” and demonstrate the true (and nearly miraculous) value oil and gas brings to the world.’ As Vice President of Marketing and co-founder of Castagra Products Tatsuya Nakagawa remarks in drillinginfo ‘there are still only a handful of companies in the oil industry that really push the marketing boundaries…’ The offshore oil & gas industry lags behind other industries when it comes to social media engagement and content marketing. Conducting a Google search on the topic is comparable to searching for a needle in a haystack. Among the needles, which I prefer to refer to as pearls, are blogs by TwinEngine (14 Trends in Online & Social Marketing in 2014), Tribe Rocket (Oil and Gas News Alert: Industry Turns Down Billions in Profits) and drillinginfo articles. Traditional versus content marketing mindset James Hahn, owner of Tribe Rocket, sums it up nicely in The Top 5 Marketing Mistakes Oil & Gas Operators Make, ‘…our industry is at an inflection point. New technologies aren’t just changing the way people live, they are changing the way they think. And you can’t play ostrich and ignore these facts anymore.’ According to James Hahn, ‘People in oil and gas tend to have a very traditional mindset that says, “I need to meet people in person to build relationships and grow my business.”’ Understandable, but if your business contacts are building relationships using social media, your first encounter with them might not be face-to-face. Social media is also a cost-effective way to reach a large target group. Take LinkedIn for example. ‘Compared to running content in a traditional publication, like The Globe and Mail’s Report on Business, Huska* says LinkedIn can provide reach without any wastage, a pain point for clients in industries like oil and gas or business-to-business technology that look to target a very specific niche.’  Best practices oil & gas social media For inspiration, see: • Tatsuya Nakagawa’s examples of top content marketing cases: 4 Ways the Oil Industry can Create Raving Fans & Brand • successful social media cases of four trailblazers (Statoil, Shell, Chesapeake, Payson Petroleum) • TwinEngine’s list of the top 100 oil & gas companies involved in social media.   * Armin Huska, Digital Managing Director at Mindshare   Image courtesy of Ryan McGuire, Bells Design (http://www.gratisography.com/). An incredible source for free...

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Easy SEO copy tips for products and services

Posted by on Sep 29, 2016 in Blog, Featured | 0 comments

Want to write better online product and service descriptions? Here are some helpful writing tips I received from Dutch SEO trainer Bob van de Vooren. This article handles the building blocks of good web copy. Much more is involved in writing for the web, but these tips will get you started.

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Mobile copywriting: cutting copy to convert

Posted by on Sep 29, 2016 in Blog, Uncategorized | 1 comment

You have a small rectangle in which to write a story. Your mission: fill this LED-lit object with simple and concise words that convert. The stopwatch ticks. Eyes focus on the centre upper half. Just like an agile whitewater rafter in the Grand Canyon, your (first) words manoeuvre and propel them further. Over the next paragraph, and the next. Until they reach the finish line. A finger presses a button. Whew. Mission completed within eight seconds. Engage mobile users with compact writing  American author, Ernest Hemingway, wrote a story using only six words: ‘For sale. Baby shoes. Never worn.‘  Six-word stories are still a rare exception; but, for how long? A Microsoft study shows that our attention span has gone from 12 seconds to eight seconds within a span of 13 years. And it seems that the more we use our smartphone, the shorter our attention span becomes. With mobile use on the rise, the focus is shifting from desktop to mobile copywriting. A clear, compact and visual writing style is nowadays essential. Hemingway’s minimalistic writing style (the Iceberg Theory or Theory of Omission) is helpful in writing for today’s heavy mobile users. Clear and simple language in which the reader implicitly grasps the (deeper) meaning or message. Writing less requires more time and energy. It also means you have to write better copy. Mobile versus desktop viewing Neil Patel’s article on how to write engaging content for mobile readers, explains why mobile device usage is different from desktop. For one, mobile viewers look mainly at the centre and top half of the screen (see eye-tracking study by Briggsby). Desktop users, on the other hand, focus largely on the upper left corner. An F-shaped area known as the ‘golden triangle’. This is why writing more powerful content above the fold is crucial in seizing mobile readers’ attention. Images below the mobile fold People also look at images more than they view text. To save precious screen space, Neil suggests using fewer images (especially if they don’t advance your point). Neil’s other tips: eliminate unnecessary words create short, strong headlines use short paragraphs. New mobile copywriting style guide? Maybe a new style guide for mobile readers needs to be invented. For starters, to save space, maybe eight should be written 8. Image courtesy of nongpimmy at...

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